Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)

My Records, My Choice


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If you made an IAP or ADR claim for compensation for residential school abuse, the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement says that you can save your IAP or ADR records for history, public education and research at the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR).

The IAP is the Independent Assessment Process for compensation claims of abuse at residential schools. The ADR was the earlier Alternative Dispute Resolution process.

What are my choices for my IAP or ADR records?

You can:

  • Do nothing: your records will remain confidential and will then be destroyed on September 19, 2027
  • Get a copy for yourself to keep or share with others
  • Preserve them for history, public education and research at the NCTR
  • Get a copy for yourself and preserve them for history, public education and research at the NCTR

The choice is yours and yours alone.

What records are we talking about?

  • Your application form
  • The printed record of your testimony (transcript)
  • The voice recording of your testimony
  • The decision on your claim

Your records include your name and all of the information you provided for your IAP or ADR claim, everything you said at your hearing, what the adjudicator said about you in their decision, and the compensation you received. Your records describe the abuse you suffered and how it affected your life. They may include information about your health, employment and criminal history, and other sensitive information.

Can I get a copy of my own records?

Yes. You can request a copy of your IAP or ADR records from the IAP Secretariat. There is a separate form for that. You have until September 19, 2027 to request a copy of your records for yourself, to keep or share with others.

If you want a copy of your records, contact IAP Information toll-free at 1-877-635-2648.

Why am I being asked about my records?

In 2017 the Supreme Court of Canada said that because your IAP or ADR records are private and confidential, they will be automatically destroyed, unless you choose to preserve them for yourself or for history, research and public education at the NCTR.

What is the NCTR?

The NCTR was created by the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to preserve the history and legacy of the residential schools. It has the responsibility to foster truth, reconciliation and healing. The NCTR is advised by a Survivors’ Circle and Governing Circle of Indigenous people. It is hosted at the University of Manitoba and is the permanent home for the records of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

How would my records be used at the NCTR?

If you decide to preserve your records at the NCTR, you have a choice of two ways to do that: restricted access or open access. In either case the NCTR will use and share your records for public education and research to promote reconciliation. The NCTR is also committed to the respectful and dignified use of your records and of doing no harm.

  • Restricted access means the NCTR may use and share your records with others for purposes such as public education, but only if the NCTR removes your personal information. Personal information means information thatidentifies you or could be used to identify you. Your personal information will be made available to the NCTR and researchers, but only under strict confidentiality conditions. Your personal information will not be available to the public and will not be published.
  • Open access means the NCTR may use your records and personal information, including your name, in the way it thinks is appropriate including by sharing with others. However, the NCTR will not disclose certain personal information, such as your address, phone number, band or disc number.

For both restricted or open access, all information that identifies other people will be removed before your records are transferred to the NCTR, to protect their privacy.

Benefits and risks

The benefit of preserving your records is that they will help future generations understand the history and impacts of the residential schools on First Nation, Inuit and Métis peoples and communities.

For restricted access, your personal information will be kept confidential but there will always be the chance that you are identified by mistake. You will not control what researchers may be allowed to see your records. The NCTR will decide that.

For open access, you will not control who sees your records or how they are used. The NCTR will decide whether to make your records including your personal information available to the public. You will not be able control how people react to that information and what they do with it.

For both restricted and open access, the NCTR will keep your records in a highly secure database that is managed by carefully trained staff. However, there will always be a risk of unauthorized access to the database.

The restrictions in this agreement are permanent

Records archived at the NCTR are managed according to Manitoba laws, including The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation Act. Your records will not be disclosed through access requests under The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Your records will ONLY be made available as permitted by this agreement. This agreement is made under section 6 of The National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation Act and confirmed by court order.

What if I change my mind about preserving my records?

If you decide to preserve your records at the NCTR, you have the right to change your mind later. You may change the type of access or you may withdraw your consent altogether and have your records removed from the NCTR. It is important to understand that if you choose open access and want to change or withdraw your consent, your personal information may already have been made public.

If you change your mind, contact IAP Information toll-free at 1-877-635-2648 or the NCTR toll-free at 1-855-415-4534.

Do you have questions?

If you want more information about your choices or assistance with this form, contact:

If you want to learn more about the NCTR, contact them:

The choice is yours and yours alone.